Socio-economic Inequality in Stunting among Children Aged 6-59 Months in a Ugandan Population Based Cross-sectional Study

Socio-economic Inequality in Stunting among Children Aged 6-59 Months in a Ugandan Population Based Cross-sectional Study

American Journal of Pediatrics
Volume 5, Issue 3, September 2019, Pages: 125-132
Received: Apr. 18, 2019; Accepted: Jun. 14, 2019; Published: Aug. 6, 2019
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Authors
Baru Ruth Sharon Apio, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Victoria University Kampala, Kampala, Uganda
Ratib Mawa, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Victoria University Kampala, Kampala, Uganda
Stephen Lawoko, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Victoria University Kampala, Kampala, Uganda
Krishna Nand Sharma, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Victoria University Kampala, Kampala, Uganda

 

Abstract
Socio-economic status is an important predictor of stunting, however published population based studies on socio-economic inequalities in stunting among children under-five years of age is scarce in Uganda. Data from the 2016 Uganda Demographic and Health Survey was used to identify possible socio-economic inequalities in stunting among 3941 children aged 6-59 months. Multivariate binary logistic regression models were fitted to calculate the odds ratios and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals for stunting by maternal formal education and household wealth index. The overall prevalence of stunting among children was 30.1%. The risk of stunting was higher among children whose mothers had no formal education (OR: 4.35; 95% CI, 2.45-7.71), attained primary (OR: 2.74 95% CI, 1.62-4.63) and secondary level education (OR: 2.30 95% CI, 1.34-3.96) compared to those whose mothers attained tertiary level education. Similarly higher risk of stunting was found among children that lived in the poorest (OR: 1.78 95% CI, 1.23-2.59), poorer (OR: 1.88; 95% CI, (1.28-2.74), middle (OR: 1.91, 95% CI, 1.31-2.77) and richer households (OR: 1.60; 95% CI, 1.10-2.32) compared to those in the richest households. Socio-economic differences in stunting among children under-five years of age were found. Targeting stunting prevention interventions to less affluent mother-child dyads and households might be important in reducing social inequalities in stunting among children under-five years of age in Uganda.

 


Keywords
Stunting, Children, Socio-economic Status, Inequalities, Uganda


To cite this article
Baru Ruth Sharon Apio, Ratib Mawa, Stephen Lawoko, Krishna Nand Sharma, Socio-economic Inequality in Stunting among Children Aged 6-59 Months in a Ugandan Population Based Cross-sectional Study, American Journal of Pediatrics. Vol. 5, No. 3, 2019, pp. 125-132. doi: 10.11648/j.ajp.20190503.18
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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